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Saving Tomorrow – Book Review

Saving Tomorrow by [Meggs, Remmy]

The time does not matter, that is a matter of your beliefs, however the temperature of the earth had risen to average of 59 degrees. The ice age as we know it, was over, and however man survived it, they did.

This is near the beginning of man himself. Pangaea or the “Garden Of Paradise” could have been around for millions if not billions of years. If you believe in the Tree of Knowledge, then you believe in the Tree of Life. If man and animals ate from the Tree of Life, then they too could have lived millions, if not billions of years.

If you believe in evolution, then the same applies.

Meet young Air, he was not a hunter or a warrior, but he had the talent to see what others could not see.

Saving Tomorrow is an epic tale of survival and coming of age adventure story written for young people, 13+.  Set after the second ice age, the story follows a group of friends who learn how to survive despite the harsh realities of their time.

Strong characters lead the way and one in particular stands out. A young boy called Air who doesn’t rise to the expectations of his tribe. Many heroes have started out differently from their peers, Air is no exception, he doesn’t fit in and is intriguing from the start.

Different tribes are drawn in as Air and his friend’s battle to survive against the odds presented by their challenging environment and greater challenges heading their way. Air’s friends also learn of his connections with all living creatures and must learn to accept him as he is. Not so simple for everybody they meet. Air isn’t affected by what people think, rather what is coming. Although, Remmy Meggs keeps us guessing at the specifics of that far into the story.

I enjoyed reading ‘Saving Tomorrow’ although the writer in me wanted to push it along occasionally. Some of the pitfalls of writing a long story came to light with the odd inconsistency but these don’t interfere with readability.

Regardless of technicalities, this was a great story from a young writer I sense will go far. He can certainly tell a great story. If I could award stars for writing and storytelling separately I give three and five respectively. I can’t do that on Amazon so I give a well-deserved four stars.

Editorial Reviews

From the Author

It took three years to create this book and another year of editing before it went to a professional editor. I am an author that does not believe a book, or movie for that matter, needs vulgar words nor do I believe a book needs raw sex in it, to be good.

For that I get a young adult (YA) rating which means anyone over the age of thirteen should be able to read this book without trauma. This is not a children’s book although I would like those over ten years of age to read it. However it does have violence and death in it as well as sexual situations. Actually more like a good science fiction book written by the masters. That will be up to parents to decide.

From the Back Cover

In BCE the temperature of the earth had risen to an average of fifty-nine degrees.The second ice age, as we know it, was over and how ever man survived it, they did  We do not know what the birth and death rates were before and during the ice age, but man had come into his own.It had never rained in Pangaea at this time. There was no aging.

Our story begins with the medium-light skinned areas now known as the Middle East. A group of tribes who avoided war as best they could. This enabled them to use their knowledge to improve their way of life. In this area of the world, the night could get very cold, but many days, if the winds were just right, it would be like a modern blast furnace.

Meet young Air. He was not, and never would be, the hunter or a warrior that histribe wanted, but he had the talent to see what others could not see. The war is not with man; it is with the Earth, and the Earth will win at any cost.

About the Author

Remmy Meggs started writing at the age of twelve. His third book, Legacy Grapes of Rome was published first. His first book, Saving Tomorrow was published in 2016. The book he loves most he wrote in the middle of those two and it is called Changes.

Discover Remmy’s books on Amazon

Reviews make an authors day

Starting the week with a five star review is wonderful and I am sure every writer can identify with that. But, what keeps our readers from posting their reviews? Especially after they have told you how much they enjoyed reading the book via email or social media.

Why readers don’t review isn’t a new debate so, don’t worry, I’m not going to go on about this. Except to say:

  • Your words to an author are just as important as the words in their books are to you.
  • What you say about a book you’ve read can make a huge difference to the success of an author. Especially to those who aren’t yet getting their books reviewed in the mainstream press.
  • Leaving a review is kind and the world definitely needs more of that.
  • Reviews encourage others to read the book

 

There’s no need to write a lengthy work of art. You could simply say,

‘Beyond The Pyre was a great story, I loved the characters and will look out for more from this author.’

Once done, you can copy and paste to Amazon, Goodreads and any other review platforms you are aware of.

If you would like to write something more detailed, you might want to consider the following template. You don’t have to answer every question; they’re suggestions!

Points to Ponder:

  • What was the story about?
  • Who were the main characters?
  • Were the characters credible?
  • What did the main characters do in the story?
  • Did the main characters run into any problems? Adventures?
  • Who was your favourite character? Why

 

Your personal experiences

  • Did you relate to any of the characters in the story?
  • Have you ever done or felt some of the things the book raises?

 

Your opinion

  • Did you like the book?
  • What was your favourite part?
  • Did you have a least favourite part?
  • If you could change something, what would it be? (If you wish you could change the ending, but don’t reveal it on a public forum! Authors eyes only.)

 

Your recommendation

  • Would you recommend this book to another person?
  • What type of person might like this book?

 

I love to engage with readers and other authors. Don’t hesitate to drop me a line. I will always respond.

Now on to the review that launched my Monday. A big thank you to Remmy Meggs in The USA for this.

Title: Beyond the Pyre
Author: Steve Costello
Genre: Historical Fiction
Publisher: Austin
Release Date: June 20, 2017
Format: Paperback, Kindle, hardback
Pages: 366
Source: Amazon.com

When I read a book about a country that I am not familiar with, I always open a map, so I can follow along with the story line. In this case it was France. As a child a few years ago I went to France, however I do not remember much of the trip. I do remember the boys wearing shorts and of all things either long sleeve shirts or sweaters. Since it was warm out, that didn’t make sense to an eight year old American boy.

I do the same with history, not to prove the author wrong, but to follow his lead. So in this case I looked up the word Cathar, and found as much detail as I could on the subject. To me dates are important in history, not that I memorize them, but there is a difference between Pope Innocent and Pope Alexander.  These are important details for me.

Now about the book Beyond the Pyre by Steve Costello (June 2017) I was told I was pronouncing Pyre wrong by one of my Anglo Saxon friends in Northern England, (South of Scottish England). That is because of the English spelling, the same English that type tyre instead of tire. Confusing.

Now that is out of the way, I found this book a lot different than any other book I have read the last five years. Yes, it is that different. True it only has one goal, and I do not think it is supposed to be scary story, however several times the hair on the back of my neck stood up, and a few times chills went down my spine.

The history of almost any church, Christian, Muslim, Jewish, is full of atrocities, including current events.  However as I read this book, I found so many fascinating things. First of all the characterizations. They were three dimensional, similar to how I write, I do not find three dimensional characters in books very often, so that is a plus. Just about every character was true to life.

The protagonist, actually I was not sure who the main character was because it seemed to me that each person was a main character. Yes it starts out with Ben and Catharine, but it quickly develops into something much more monumental.

American readers will see a difference in dialog, but only because it seems the English use single quotations instead of double quotations, and other minor differences. The subject matter is a matter of opinion, but one thing that grabbed my attention in chapter three I believe, was:

Elionor didn’t believe in the devil despite her Catholic upbringing: human beings created evil and could not lay blame elsewhere. – Steve Costello, Beyond the Pyre

Although I believe that to be true, by the end of the book, you will be in wonder. This is a good versus evil book, just remember that everyone has some good in them, no matter how evil they are.

I give this book 5 out of 5 stars, not many can write something like this unless they have lived close to it. – Remmy Meggs Nov 2017

Buy From Amazon

The Back of an Envelope

I’m editing my work in progress and thought it might be interesting to see what somebody else has to say about the process. Here’s what Nick Hornby, The Polysyllabic Spree said.

“Anyone and everyone taking a writing class knows that the secret of good writing is to cut it back, pare it down, winnow, chop, hack, prune, and trim, remove every superfluous word, compress, compress, compress…
Actually, when you think about it, not many novels in the Spare tradition are terribly cheerful. Jokes you can usually pluck out whole, by the roots, so if you’re doing some heavy-duty prose-weeding, they’re the first to go. And there’s some stuff about the whole winnowing process I just don’t get. Why does it always stop when the work in question has been reduced to sixty or seventy thousand words–entirely coincidentally, I’m sure, the minimum length for a publishable novel? I’m sure you could get it down to twenty or thirty if you tried hard enough. In fact, why stop at twenty or thirty? Why write at all? Why not just jot the plot and a couple of themes down on the back of an envelope and leave it at that? The truth is, there’s nothing very utilitarian about fiction or its creation, and I suspect that people are desperate to make it sound manly, back-breaking labour because it’s such a wussy thing to do in the first place. The obsession with austerity is an attempt to compensate, to make writing resemble a real job, like farming, or logging. (It’s also why people who work in advertising put in twenty-hour days.) Go on, young writers–treat yourself to a joke, or an adverb! Spoil yourself! Readers won’t mind!”

Interesting thoughts from Hornby says he who has just edited the following paragraphs relating to ‘Blue Star’ or ‘Blue’ as she is known by her friends in the Wiccan world. You might find her in “Under An Ancient Name” after I have edited it down to the back of an envelope.

Blue Star made her way to Simon giving the unnecessary excuse that she had made herself available to him as his Wicca mentor. Taking her seat, she smoothed out her ‘crinkle look’ skirt. Made eye contact with Simon for an instant, modestly lowered her eyes then raised them, showing a hint of mischief.

‘Shall we begin by stating our own positions on the points the speaker has raised?’ Without waiting, although Ben and Simon managed nods of the head, Blue outlined her beliefs.

‘I am a Wiccan priestess and Wicca is the only religion I follow. Nature guides, I follow the seasons like the natural clockwork they are. I believe in a single power, a supreme energy force that does not rule over the universe because, it is the universe. It looks after nature; it is nature and a mass of simultaneous Divine energy.’

‘I’ve been through this so many times, I often question my own thoughts, I guess that’s healthy but hey, who knows? Sorry, I talk lots when I’m nervous. No idea why I’m nervous either, it’s not usual.’

Oh dear, where will I put the rest of the story? E.A. Bucchianeri, Brushstrokes of a Gadfly to the rescue.

“Editors can be stupid at times. They just ignore that author’s intention. I always try to read unabridged editions, so much is lost with cut versions of classic literature, even movies don’t make sense when they are edited too much. I love the longueurs of a book even if they seem pointless because you can get a peek into the author’s mind, a glimpse of their creative soul. I mean, how would people like it if editors came along and said to an artist, ‘Whoops, you left just a tad too much space around that lily pad there, lets crop that a bit, shall we?’. Monet would be ripping his hair out.”

Your own thoughts are very welcome. I won’t try to edit . . . promise.

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