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Friday Teaser

Recent health issues have caused chaos with my work but I am happy to report that editing my current novel is back on track and plans for the one to follow that are well underway. I’ve not worked on two novels simultaneously before but something tells me that this is currently the way to go.

I hope you enjoy this short peek at a possible opening to ‘Supper in Jerusalem.’

Stood on a Mediterranean beach at dawn, watching the sunrise and fading silhouette of a small fishing boat that just left him. Simon couldn’t think of a better postcard view.

Turning inland, the desolation of a once thriving fishing port burned the positive images to ash. Evidence of domesticity smashed and broken still smouldered after another attack. The rumble of a solitary aircraft returning from its silent hours sortie over desolate cities. Bombs dispatched to the rebels, and innocents.

Simon heard the call and placed himself on the fringes of the most complicated civil war of his lifetime and he didn’t care for his safety. He cared only for those who wanted to reclaim their lives. He didn’t know who they were where to look or how to approach them. Trust would be an issue. They had been deserted while others around them joined factions with dangerous agendas that excluded their well-being and ignored their futures.

Over eleven million people fleeing the violence. Five million fled to neighbouring countries that don’t have the infrastructure to care for them. He looked at the crumpled leaflet in his hand and recited from memory.

“Nearly eight years since it began, the war has killed more than 480,000 people. Crowded cities have been destroyed and horrific human rights violations are widespread. Basic necessities like food and medical care are sparse.”

Clearing his throat and pulling back the tears, he continued.

“The U.N. estimates that 6.3 million people are internally displaced. When you also consider refugees, well over half of the country’s pre-war population of 22 million is in need of urgent humanitarian assistance, whether they still remain in the country or have escaped across the borders.”

It started with protests about the government, people wanted change, not the destruction that came their way. The situation became worse after outside parties intent on gratifying their own interests got involved; Russia, The USA, China, the list goes on. The number of civilian casualties and families forced to leave their homes in search of safety exploded when the major powers threw in their weight.

He opened out the leaflet and looked at a picture of a smiling young man standing on the rubble that had been his school. Years of his life lost to the war.  No family. No education. No basic human rights. The headline read, “Resolved to do something about his future.”

Simon had to find this young man before it was too late.

Saving Tomorrow – Book Review

Saving Tomorrow by [Meggs, Remmy]

The time does not matter, that is a matter of your beliefs, however the temperature of the earth had risen to average of 59 degrees. The ice age as we know it, was over, and however man survived it, they did.

This is near the beginning of man himself. Pangaea or the “Garden Of Paradise” could have been around for millions if not billions of years. If you believe in the Tree of Knowledge, then you believe in the Tree of Life. If man and animals ate from the Tree of Life, then they too could have lived millions, if not billions of years.

If you believe in evolution, then the same applies.

Meet young Air, he was not a hunter or a warrior, but he had the talent to see what others could not see.

Saving Tomorrow is an epic tale of survival and coming of age adventure story written for young people, 13+.  Set after the second ice age, the story follows a group of friends who learn how to survive despite the harsh realities of their time.

Strong characters lead the way and one in particular stands out. A young boy called Air who doesn’t rise to the expectations of his tribe. Many heroes have started out differently from their peers, Air is no exception, he doesn’t fit in and is intriguing from the start.

Different tribes are drawn in as Air and his friend’s battle to survive against the odds presented by their challenging environment and greater challenges heading their way. Air’s friends also learn of his connections with all living creatures and must learn to accept him as he is. Not so simple for everybody they meet. Air isn’t affected by what people think, rather what is coming. Although, Remmy Meggs keeps us guessing at the specifics of that far into the story.

I enjoyed reading ‘Saving Tomorrow’ although the writer in me wanted to push it along occasionally. Some of the pitfalls of writing a long story came to light with the odd inconsistency but these don’t interfere with readability.

Regardless of technicalities, this was a great story from a young writer I sense will go far. He can certainly tell a great story. If I could award stars for writing and storytelling separately I give three and five respectively. I can’t do that on Amazon so I give a well-deserved four stars.

Editorial Reviews

From the Author

It took three years to create this book and another year of editing before it went to a professional editor. I am an author that does not believe a book, or movie for that matter, needs vulgar words nor do I believe a book needs raw sex in it, to be good.

For that I get a young adult (YA) rating which means anyone over the age of thirteen should be able to read this book without trauma. This is not a children’s book although I would like those over ten years of age to read it. However it does have violence and death in it as well as sexual situations. Actually more like a good science fiction book written by the masters. That will be up to parents to decide.

From the Back Cover

In BCE the temperature of the earth had risen to an average of fifty-nine degrees.The second ice age, as we know it, was over and how ever man survived it, they did  We do not know what the birth and death rates were before and during the ice age, but man had come into his own.It had never rained in Pangaea at this time. There was no aging.

Our story begins with the medium-light skinned areas now known as the Middle East. A group of tribes who avoided war as best they could. This enabled them to use their knowledge to improve their way of life. In this area of the world, the night could get very cold, but many days, if the winds were just right, it would be like a modern blast furnace.

Meet young Air. He was not, and never would be, the hunter or a warrior that histribe wanted, but he had the talent to see what others could not see. The war is not with man; it is with the Earth, and the Earth will win at any cost.

About the Author

Remmy Meggs started writing at the age of twelve. His third book, Legacy Grapes of Rome was published first. His first book, Saving Tomorrow was published in 2016. The book he loves most he wrote in the middle of those two and it is called Changes.

Discover Remmy’s books on Amazon

The Back of an Envelope

I’m editing my work in progress and thought it might be interesting to see what somebody else has to say about the process. Here’s what Nick Hornby, The Polysyllabic Spree said.

“Anyone and everyone taking a writing class knows that the secret of good writing is to cut it back, pare it down, winnow, chop, hack, prune, and trim, remove every superfluous word, compress, compress, compress…
Actually, when you think about it, not many novels in the Spare tradition are terribly cheerful. Jokes you can usually pluck out whole, by the roots, so if you’re doing some heavy-duty prose-weeding, they’re the first to go. And there’s some stuff about the whole winnowing process I just don’t get. Why does it always stop when the work in question has been reduced to sixty or seventy thousand words–entirely coincidentally, I’m sure, the minimum length for a publishable novel? I’m sure you could get it down to twenty or thirty if you tried hard enough. In fact, why stop at twenty or thirty? Why write at all? Why not just jot the plot and a couple of themes down on the back of an envelope and leave it at that? The truth is, there’s nothing very utilitarian about fiction or its creation, and I suspect that people are desperate to make it sound manly, back-breaking labour because it’s such a wussy thing to do in the first place. The obsession with austerity is an attempt to compensate, to make writing resemble a real job, like farming, or logging. (It’s also why people who work in advertising put in twenty-hour days.) Go on, young writers–treat yourself to a joke, or an adverb! Spoil yourself! Readers won’t mind!”

Interesting thoughts from Hornby says he who has just edited the following paragraphs relating to ‘Blue Star’ or ‘Blue’ as she is known by her friends in the Wiccan world. You might find her in “Under An Ancient Name” after I have edited it down to the back of an envelope.

Blue Star made her way to Simon giving the unnecessary excuse that she had made herself available to him as his Wicca mentor. Taking her seat, she smoothed out her ‘crinkle look’ skirt. Made eye contact with Simon for an instant, modestly lowered her eyes then raised them, showing a hint of mischief.

‘Shall we begin by stating our own positions on the points the speaker has raised?’ Without waiting, although Ben and Simon managed nods of the head, Blue outlined her beliefs.

‘I am a Wiccan priestess and Wicca is the only religion I follow. Nature guides, I follow the seasons like the natural clockwork they are. I believe in a single power, a supreme energy force that does not rule over the universe because, it is the universe. It looks after nature; it is nature and a mass of simultaneous Divine energy.’

‘I’ve been through this so many times, I often question my own thoughts, I guess that’s healthy but hey, who knows? Sorry, I talk lots when I’m nervous. No idea why I’m nervous either, it’s not usual.’

Oh dear, where will I put the rest of the story? E.A. Bucchianeri, Brushstrokes of a Gadfly to the rescue.

“Editors can be stupid at times. They just ignore that author’s intention. I always try to read unabridged editions, so much is lost with cut versions of classic literature, even movies don’t make sense when they are edited too much. I love the longueurs of a book even if they seem pointless because you can get a peek into the author’s mind, a glimpse of their creative soul. I mean, how would people like it if editors came along and said to an artist, ‘Whoops, you left just a tad too much space around that lily pad there, lets crop that a bit, shall we?’. Monet would be ripping his hair out.”

Your own thoughts are very welcome. I won’t try to edit . . . promise.

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